Start Welding Today with Your Lincoln Electric Welder

the following presentation features the
usable Lincoln Electric combination wire feed welder for best results always use Lincoln
wire and replacement parts this is your best assurance for premium
feedability and trouble-free operation. Lincoln Electric, world leader in the
manufacture of arc welding products welcomes you to a new era in workshop
welding. Your new compact lightweight welder is
specially designed and engineered for easy operating, safety and long-term
service. Lincoln has set the standard in industrial
welding for over a century. Your new equipment was manufactured with
the same care and attention that goes into all Lincoln products so
you can enjoy many years of dependable trouble-free service. Your new welder is an easily portable
power source and wire feeder combination. It's been designed for workshop, hobby
and light maintenance uses Even light duty, general-purpose welding
with self-shielded flus-cored Innershield wire or solid wire with shielding gas.

These
machines can be used to weld low-carbon steels and aluminum with the FCAW and GMAW processes please note: some 125 amp machines are FCAW only and cannot weld aluminum. For lists of wire types sizes and
recommended shielding gases look at the inside of the door panel on
your Lincoln welder In simple terms welding is melting two pieces of metal
together using localized high-intensity heat. In
arc welding the heat is generated by electric
current that flows from the machine through the cable and gun assembly to
the wire and across the arc.

On the work side of the arc current flows
through the base metal to the work clamp and back to the machine. During the
welding process the arc forms a pool or puddle to
assure a solid weld. This puddle must be filled with
additional weld metal from the weld wire. You're also probably
aware that the weld must be protected from the surrounding air to prevent weld defects. The easiest way
to do this is by welding with self-shielded flux
cored wire or innershield in the core materials
burn in the arc to create a protective slag that keeps air away from the molten
metal. You can also keep air away from the welding area by introducing a
shielding gas.

This method uses a different wire and is
known as gas metal arc welding. You'll find that most metal items around
the Home or workshop are made of low carbon steels, also called mild steel. They are easily welded. Your
welder can handle most of these light gauge, low carbon steel materials and with practice they are easily
welded. Some steel contains higher carbon levels or other alloys, making them more difficult to weld. These
samples or exotic metals are not recommended for welding with
your wire feed welder basically if a magnet sticks to the
metal and you can cut the metal easily with a
file chances are very good that you will be able to weld the material
successfully with your new machine.

The Lincoln
publication New Lessons in Arc Welding provides
in-depth detail for identifying various types of steel and other metals and the proper procedures for welding
them. These wire feed welders are protected
by a thermostat and a circuit breaker. The machines shut
down if their amperage ratings are exceeded or if the
machines start to overheat. There's no question that welding with
any machine can be dangerous its strict safety procedures are not
followed. If you adhere to the precautions exactly every time you will minimize or
eliminate the hazards from electric shock arc rays, fumes and gases and stray
welding sparks. You will avoid many work hazards by
keeping your workplace clean and free of fuels, chemicals, paints, solvents and other
materials that can ignite if struck by a hot welding spark. Of
course a fire extinguisher should be handy. Your workspace should be out of the way so that others don't inadvertently look
at the arc, get struck by a spark, or distract you from what you're doing.
Suitable dress includes dry clothing made from flame resistant materials. Treated cotton or wall are good choices.

Long sleeve shirts and long pants
without cuffs to catch hot weld spatter shield your body against sparks and
harmful arc rays. Dry hole-free leather work gloves help
protect hands from the dangerou of burns from hot metal and electric shock. High top leather footwear is best. Long
hair should be tied back or tucked under a hat. Some tools needed for safe operation
include welding helmets or face shields with arc welding filter lenses for you and
any assistants. Pliers for picking up hot metal, a
chipping hammer, safety glasses, a wire cutter, a wire
brush and clamps. Your body should not come in
contact with the welding circuit if any part of your body could come in
contact with the metal being welded insulate yourself from the workpiece on
the welding circuit by using an non-conductive non flammable material such as a rubber
mat. Remember the electrodes in work circuits
are electrically hot whenever the welder is on and the gun trigger is pressed. Before you start welding make sure the
work surface is clean and free of contaminants that may ignite for generate toxic fumes.

Galvanized or
painted steels are typical sources. Never weld on
containers that have held combustible such as gas cans, paint cans or even hydraulic hoses; they
could explode. If you're not sure don't weld on it. And always disconnect
electrical devices before welding on them. Try to work in a comfortable position if
you must work in an awkward position take additional care to avoid injury.
Fumes and gases are a normal byproduct of the welding process. Use enough ventilation to keep fumes and
gases from your breathing zone and general area.

When welding indoors it may be necessary to use an exhaust
system. Always turn off and unplug the unit when you're not welding or
servicing the machine. Also remember to turn off your shielding
gas when you were done welding. And finally, improperly maintained
equipment always poses the potential for problems.
Be sure that all connections are tight that there are no breaks in the cable or
gone insulation and make sure that all components are in
proper working order.

Never weld with equipment that has
damaged or missing insulation. Your new wire feed welder is
a reliable safe tool you should always adhere to the safety
guidelines and use common sense but remember safety depends on you. As shipped from the factory your new
welder has everything you need to start inner
shield or self-shielded flux cored welding. To be a real pro you'll need a welding
helmet, leather gloves, safety glasses, a chipping
hammer, a wire brush clamp, pliers and a fire extinguisher.

If you don't already have these items we recommend that you purchase them
before you start welding. They'll come in handy and make your job
easier and safer. Your wire feed welder must be plugged into the proper
receptacle and plugged into system ground approved
by the National Electric Code and local codes. But be sure to select a circuit that
has few or no other appliances drawing power this will eliminate ripping the circuit
breakers or blowing a fuse. Extension cords if required must be
rated for the application. Use grounded outlets only, do not use an
adapter. Have a qualified electrician install a
grounded outlet for you. The welder should be installed in a dry
area and there should be an open area around the louvers front and back. Be sure you can open the
access door on the side of the unit after the machine has been set up and
the gun in work cables had been installed according to the instructions
in your welding guide, you can then prepare the unit for
welding. Locate the sample of .035 NR 211 MP flux cored wire and place onto the wire spool spindle. Orient
the spool so that the wire feeds off the top
of the spool.

Secure the spool by tightening the wingnut against the spacer that holds the wire
spool on the spindle. Do not over tighten the spool. Open the pivot arm assembly by rotating
the tension arm assembly down and lift the pivot arm assembly up.
Remove the drive roll by unscrewing the black knob that holds the drive on. Install the dual groove drive roll with
the point 035 mark facing outward, which will allow feeding of the point
035 NR 211 MP flux cored wire. Carefully undo the wire at the
point where the wire anchors to the spool. Cut approximately
two inches of the end of the wire; do not let the
end of the wire go to prevent the wire from unspooling. Feed the wire through the incoming guide over the drive roll groove, through the
outgoing guide and wire drive outlet on the gun side. Close the pivot arm
assembly and secure by rotating the tension arm assembly back to the up
position. Rotate the tension are knob until the
numerical dial indicates about 3.

If the wire slips
on the drive role increase the pressure until slipping
stops. If the wire becomes flattened excessively loosen the pressure adjustment to reduce
the distortion. Remove the nozzle from the gun and
contact tip and straighten the gun out flat. Turn the machine power to on and
depress the gun trigger. Turn up the wire speed control to feed
the wire through the gun liner until the wire comes out of the threaded
end of the gun several inches. Hold the gun away from yourself and
others while feeding the wire. When the trigger
is released the spool of wire should not unwind. Adjust the wire spool brake accordingly. Turn the machine off and install the
point 035 contact tip. Install the black welding nozzle to the
gun. Trim the wire stick out to half an inch from the contact tip. Also keep in mind that the half inch
stick out is important while welding. The setup for innershield welding is now
complete. No one can be an accomplished welder by
watching this DVD or reading books about welding.

accomplished welder

As with so many things, the key to
success is practice. But this brief overview will get you
started and help you develop your skills. More details are in your welders guide and in New Lessons in Arc Welding. There
are five basic welding joints or ways to join
metal together butt welds fillet welds, lap welds, edge welds and corner welds. Of these, butt and fillet are most common. But regardless of the process, gauge
steel or weld joint, successful welding starts with proper
surface preparation. The area to be welded should be free
rust, paint, oil or other contaminants. Sand, grind
or wire brush the work area.

Remove any traces a solvent you may have used to clean off oil. Now let's take a look at a specific
example. Here we are using to pieces of 10 gauge
material. Set the voltage and wire speed according
to the chart on the inside of the wire feed section door. If you're unsure of the metal thickness,
check it against the gauge chart on the same door.

Once you have adjusted
the settings position your pieces and if possible
clamp them in place. Attach the work lamp as close to the
joint as you can. Be sure it makes good electrical contact.
This will reduce the resistance in the welding circuit and let your welder perform efficiently.
Use care in preventing the electrical circuit from going through hinges chain hoists or electrical components;
it can severely damage them. If you are right handed hold the gun in
your right hand and remember to always make sure you
have the proper face and eye protection before you begin. Weld left to right, tilting the gun in
the direction of travel. This enables you to clearly see what you
are doing. Left-handers simply need to do the
opposite. Now turn on the machine, position the gun
at the corner of the joint and squeeze the trigger to tack the material
in position. Be sure to keep the trigger depressed while welding. To minimize distortion, place the tack welds three inches apart along a joint being welded. Here's what a good tack weld looks like. Now you can begin welding. Again to
minimize distortion weld with a backstepping technique.
This technique involves evenly distributing the heat by welding
in sections.

The important thing to watch while
welding is not the arc, but the molten puddle behind it. And
remember, you should always maintain the proper
electrode half inch stick out beyond the contact tip well inner shield welding. When finished let the workpiece cool. Remove the slag
with your hammer and examine the weld. This is an example
of a properly completed weld. And this is an example an improperly
made weld. It was done without proper tacking and
no backstepping. The most common mistake of beginning
wire welders is not fully completing the electrical circuit. With a sound metal to metal connection.
Without a completed circuit; there will be no arc. Beginners also tend
to weld too fast the result is a thin, uneven bead and poor
penetration. Poor penetration creates a weak weld prone to failure.

With proper penetration the weld will actually be stronger than
the base metal. On thicker plate, you may have to slow
down even further to get proper penetration. Keep in mind though that there are cases
when welding too slow can cause other problems. When welding on thinner plate you may have to increase
welding speed to prevent the arc from burning through the base metal. In your welders guide is a practice
exercise that will help you hone your welding skills. There are tips on running beads and
getting proper penetration for all the various types of welding
joints. In addition, your welders guide contains a section on
troubleshooting welds with photographs to help you identify
and solve problems you might encounter. If applicable your new wire feed welder
can also be used for MIG welding. Enjoy the ability to weld with
either the Innershield or MIG process to better fit all your welding
needs. Some 125 amp machines are not MIG
capable. You will need to obtain a cylinder of
co2 or co2 argon gas blend to serve as
shielding gas along with a list of safe handling
procedures from your local welding Supplier.

There are some very important
differences to be aware of when changing from flux cored to MIG welding. Reversing the machines polarity is one. Locate the sample spool of .025 L 56
solid MIG wire and place onto wire spool spindle. Orient
the spool so that the wire feeds off the top of the spool. Secure the spool by tightening the wing nut against the spacer that holds the wire
spool on the spindle; do not over tighten the spool. Open the
pivot arm assembly by rotating the tension arm assembly down, and lift the pivot arm assembly up.
Remove the drive roll by unscrewing the black knob that holds the frive roll on.

Install the dual groove drive roll with the point zero two five mark facing
outward which will allow the feeding of point zero two five L 56 solid MIG
wire. Carefully undo the wire at the point
where the wire anchors to the spool. Cut approximately two inches off
the end of the wire. Do not let the end of the wire go to
prevent the wire from unspooling.

Feed the wire through the incoming
guide over the drive roll groove, through the
outgoing guide and wire drive outlet on the gun side. Close the pivot arm
assembly and secure by rotating the tension arm
assembly back to the up position. Rotate the tension arm knob until the
numerical dial indicates about three. If the wire slips
on the drive roll increase the pressure until the slipping
stops. If the wire becomes flattened excessively loosen the pressure adjustment to reduce
the distortion. Remove the nozzle from the gun and
contact tip, and straighten the gun out flat. Turn the machine power to on and
depress the gun trigger. Turn up the wire speed control to feed
the wire through the gun liner until the wire comes out of the threaded
end of the gun several inches.

Hold the gun away from yourself and
others while feeding the wire. When the trigger
is released, the spool of wire should not unwind,
adjust the wire spool break accordingly. Turn the machine off and install the
point 025 contact tip. Install the copper or brass welding
nozzle to the gun. Trim the wire stick out to 3/8 of an inch
from the contact tip. Also keep in mind that the 3/8 inch
stick out is important while welding. The setup for
MIG, GMAW welding is now complete. The actual welding process is similar to inner shield welding. Here's how a MIG
weld should look; notice, there is no slag to remove. Routine care, maintenance and storage
of your welder is easy and when properly cared for it will
provide years of trouble-free performance. Take care not to kink, or pull the cable
around corners. Do not allow anything to roll over the
cables. When storing the unit carefully coil the
cables to get them out of the way.

You may also
want to cover the unit to protected it from dust. Of course never leave it where children
can get to it or in very damp locations. You should
occasionally clean out the inside of the welder to remove excessive dirt and dust
buildup on internal parts. When necessary clean dirt from the
gearbox and wire feed section. Inspect the
incoming guide tube and clean the inside a it if needed. The
wire feed motor fan motor gearbox and wire reel
spindle have lifetime lubrication and require no
maintenance. Keep in mind that the contact tip does
wear out and occasionally needs replacing,
typically when the hole in the contact tip becomes elongated, or if the tip contacts the molten puddle.
Because of the gun assembly design the changeover is quick and easy. Replacement tips, wire and other
welding supplies are available at your local welding supply distributor.

The welders guide has a complete list of
part numbers. And of course should your welder require
professional service your Lincoln field service shop is only
a phone call away. Let's quickly review some key points.
Your new welder can handle most light gauge mild steel if the metal passes the magnet and
final Test chances are you'll be able to weld the
material. Remember to consult the chart on the inside of the wire feed section
door for proper voltage and wire feed
settings based on metal thickness. Be sure the work lamp makes good contact in order to establish the welding
circuit. After establishing an arc watch the puddle to determine the
appropriate travel speed. And most important practice proper
safety precautions for yourself and others in the area. And remember to
read through the welders guided and owners manual that came with your new welder. With
practice and strict adherence to safety procedures you will soon become an accomplished
welder. Good luck and happy welding. .

As found on YouTube

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